Twitter Content Aggregation

When news is syndicated on Twitter, it’s called aggregated content. Many Twitter users set up dashboards filled with aggregated content from top news sources online. They then select which stories are relevant to their community, read the article and repost the link. Each article is reviewed for quality, and read so that the tweet can be personalized. Sounds like curation, doesn’t it?

But alas, it’s still called aggregating content. You can do this more efficiently by selecting an app to work with your Twitter stream. Feedtrace for example, looks out for the best links in your niche on Twitter, and displays them for you, to save you time. This is a crucial part of news aggregation. If you don’t have any way to find, organize and review the best news, you’re going to spend hours trying to find it.

Twitter Content Curation

As we’ve explained, link curation on Twitter does encompass everything – but with one fundamental difference. The Twitter feed owner does not read the article or linked content. They curate content in their niche, yes – but it’s just to fill space, or to keep their feed fresh. They might think they’re building a great feed by curating all these good-looking links, but they are doing it blind.

Retweeting links to content without really knowing what it is, or what it says, can damage your feed’s potential. And that is the real difference between content aggregation and curation on Twitter. So, what you want to be is a link aggregator – or someone that actively finds, reads and personalizes their link posts. You don’t want to syndicate content just because it looks good.

http://socialmediamagic.com/blog/difference-aggregating-curating-twitter/

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Twitter Content Aggregati…

Content Curation 101
Content curators scour the internet for valuable content, which they then share with their social communities. If you’re going to become a content curation pro, you’ll need to learn how to source the right content, and how to present this content to your fans in new and exciting ways. When you curate content for your social sites, it adds a new dimension to your pages.

Content curation begins with sourcing. To find the best content online you need to be a part of many different social communities. Subscribe to blog feeds, and Twitter feeds that provide great content. Use bookmarking tools like StumbleUpon to discover unique, rare content on the net. Finally, you should set up some Google Alerts to keep track of certain niche topics.
Once you’ve gathered your fresh content, and deemed it worthy to republish on your social sites, the next step is ‘the attention grabber.’ Read the post thoroughly and create short updates that introduce the content to your community. Say something interesting and create a really great headline for each post. Never publish content without your own input or insight!

Googling over to a nifty site called Curate Content

http://www.curatecontent.com/content-curation/are-you-doing-it-right-get-in-front-communications-3/

I found a very interesting article on the differences of Aggregating and Curating. It would seem as though with Curating, one has a physical dimension to collecting and sorting through masses of data to re submit it with your spin on the front to hook new readers into reading or browsing the information that has been gathers though scouring the internet for sources. Then they share with their communities.

Aggregation is the re-distribution of someone else’s feed. And there can be a second part to Aggregation, where one creates and publishes that one has written ona subject.

One type of Aggregation is automated where it collects information based on keywords, where curation is basically manual collection.

As stated in this article:

“In our opinion, content curation is the most valuable of the two. Automated posts have their place, but it’s not really in a strong social curation strategy. You should be complimenting your own content, with the best sundry content you can find, manually, on the internet.

It’s harder than it sounds. Anyone can grab the same old authority articles and use them. But then your social pages aren’t really giving your readers anything new. What you need to do, is get out there and search for the really obscure content. The stuff no one has seen, because the creator doesn’t bother optimizing it.

This is what will make your post shares special. Give your readers the best of the best, not just what Google thinks is the best, because a marketing team optimized that site. Dig deep, and uncover those rare blogs, feeds and networks that are small but out of this world.  ,,, view the entire article here at http://socialmediatoday.com.

 

Another view point was expressed on the Social MediaMagic site in Aggregrating and curation your Twitter account.

http://socialmediamagic.com/blog/difference-aggregating-curating-twitter/

Content Curation 101Cont…

Week 4 – Tools that may fit

Still struggling with all of these new “tools”. Hopefully, they won’t all end up like a lot of tools I’ve purchased, thinking that they might be useful, only to never see them again until I’m cleaning out stuff.

Of all the tools listed in this weeks assignment, the ones that seem to have some use for me would be Netvibes, Hootsuite, ifttt.com and Google Alert. Beyond these, I still am having difficulty in understanding why anyone would use twitter to pull useful information from. Mainly because there is too much information  to filter. How much info coming in is truth and how much more may be misdirection. I tried running several feeds that I could gather info from for what I do at work, and while watching all of these tweets coming in, I realized I could never begin to read, much less distill anything useful as there was just too much information coming in.

Netvibes looked like a place where I could gather various feeds from outside sources, but then again, it mostly resembles just a mass gathering of Tweets. At least it can visually scan tweets that may or may not interest me. But then again, it would be nice if it did what it does for forums. 

Hootsuite allows me to look at other social media sites in one place. I belong to several groups in Linkedin. It’s nice to have all of the feed sitting on one page to quickly glance at new topics and see who has joined. 

ifttt.com could be useful if I can ever figure out how to program it correctly. Which while I am on the topic of programming, this seems to be the biggest issue I have right now, how to interconnect all of these “tools” together. The more I try, the more helpless I get in trying to un remember what I did wrong to attempt to get it right. 

[Sorry, this has been an information overload week for me outside of this class, with no end in sight…]

And finally, (for week 4), there is Google Alert. This could really be useful if and when I can master the inner workings of setting it up. 

 

Even Confucius would be lost today…

There are times during these hectic weeks following the start of class when all I want to do is hit the RESET button. The more I attempt to correct whats wrong on this Blog site, the worse it gets. I am supposed to understand this stuff. It’s probably because I have yet figured out what it’s really for (?)!

Unless the “A-HA” light bulb shows up soon, I will be running on automatic until the course ends. Try and pass. Then junk everything. I really would like to make sense of why there are tooooooooo many choices and threads and recipes and links and etc, etc, etc. I disagree with what Clay Shirky states that the problem is with the filters. The filters too are nearing the same dimension as the information overload. When will be stop being so cute with each other and invent a really useful, easy to master set of tools that can be used reliably and sensibly on a day to day basis? The information age was supposed to make our lives easier – yeah, Right! 

All of this will make sense when the grid comes down. Then we will have to learn all over how to speak normal words and sentence longer than 140 characters. And be brave enough to face each other to talk over our problems and issues, instead of hiding in plain site behind our keyboards, smartphones, and networks.

 

Sorry – Rant Off

Image

 

Internet Safety – Blog 3

The internet has changed the way we do everything.

The web holds all possibilities at the tips of ones fingers.

 On its face, the web promises wonderful things. Some shiny, others cloaked in murky water. All flowing in and around the web surfer –  waiting to take you on a trip. But putting all of your trust in this shiny, feel good experience can lead to great adventures and vast information, but it will also take you on side trips filled with dark and murky shadows, with persons unknown – waiting to prey on ones weak moments of decision.

 So the question looms, how to protect oneself, while enjoying all of the benefits the web has to offer.

 Part of the problem with the web, is how it has the silent ability to absorb time. It’s this mis-management of time problem that draws people into staying longer than is necessary, and also creates scenarios that promote mistakes in judgment. The internet is an amazing tool, but it poses some safety risks. Several thoughts come to mind as to how to protect oneself online:

  1. Create stronger passwords – ones that aren’t easy to guess. And above all, don’t share these passwords with others. http://youtu.be/eaPQMiG_Ows
  1. Don’t expose personal information – be careful with financial data like credit card numbers, bank account info. Especially sharing this info with strangers. http://youtu.be/-N35jiTIPZs
  1. Watch out for e-mail scams – if it sounds to good to be true, it probably isn’t. Also watch out for web sites to look like trusted sites, but are trying to get you to use your personal financial info to buy something.
  2. Know who your doing business  with.
  3. Create safe e-mail addresses and usernames. If you create these alias versions of you, it will protect more of who you really are. Plus these sites are easier to get rid of should they become corrupt.
  4. Protect your online experience with running anti-virus and anti-malware software in the background. There is even software that will weed out cookies and anti tracking.

This site – Wiki How (to do anything) has a lot of tips on keeping safe online: http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Safe-on-the-Internet

On a day to day usage, I use the net (web) to search for answers to everyday problems I encounter at school. It’s a tool I use without thinking. But when I come across information that “feels” questionable, I begin searching for other sites that may reflect on this information, or show me it wrong. With all this power at my fingertips, I can do more in less time. But with more information coming into me, I tend to file sites in a random way. Relying on a more and more overloaded mind to remember where I put things. I am hoping that this class will help me manage this crushing amount of info in a better, more useful way. 

Internet Safety – Blog Post 3

The internet has changed the way we do everything.

The web holds all possibilities at the tips of ones fingers.

 On its face, the web promises wonderful things. Some shiny, others cloaked in murky water. All flowing in and around the web surfer –  waiting to take you on a trip. But putting all of your trust in this shiny, feel good experience can lead to great adventures and vast information, but it will also take you on side trips filled with dark and murky shadows, with persons unknown – waiting to prey on ones weak moments of decision.

 So the question looms, how to protect oneself, while enjoying all of the benefits the web has to offer.

 Part of the problem with the web, is how it has the silent ability to absorb time. It’s this mis-management of time problem that draws people into staying longer than is necessary, and also creates scenarios that promote mistakes in judgment. The internet is an amazing tool, but it poses some safety risks. Several thoughts come to mind as to how to protect oneself online:

 

  1. Create stronger passwords – ones that aren’t easy to guess. And above all, don’t share these passwords with others. http://youtu.be/eaPQMiG_Ows

 

  1. Don’t expose personal information – be careful with financial data like credit card numbers, bank account info. Especially sharing this info with strangers. http://youtu.be/-N35jiTIPZs

 

  1. Watch out for e-mail scams – if it sounds to good to be true, it probably isn’t. Also watch out for web sites to look like trusted sites, but are trying to get you to use your personal financial info to buy something.
  2. Know who your doing business  with.
  3. Create safe e-mail addresses and usernames. If you create these alias versions of you, it will protect more of who you really are. Plus these sites are easier to get rid of should they become corrupt.
  4. Protect your online experience with running anti-virus and anti-malware software in the background. There is even software that will weed out cookies and anti tracking.

 

This site – Wiki How (to do anything) has a lot of tips on keeping safe online: http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Safe-on-the-Internet

 

On a day to day usage, I use the net (web) to search for answers to everyday problems I encounter at school. It’s a tool I use without thinking. But when I come across information that “feels” questionable, I begin searching for other sites that may reflect on this information, or show me it wrong. With all this power at my fingertips, I can do more in less time. But with more information coming into me, I tend to file sites in a random way. Relying on a more and more overloaded mind to remember where I put things. I am hoping that this class will help me manage this crushing amount of info in a better, more useful way. 

Hello world!

As the sign states, happy blogging – NOT. Perhaps its because I am using a free service or stupidity reins supreme this weekend. But I experienced a Mind Meltdown somewhere between Thursday afternoon and Saturday. I could not for the life of me figure out how to post to my original blog on wordpress. The link I had saved showed I had a blog with several entries, but when I went to the site – it showed me the entries, and then claimed I had not started a blog!

So, I started a new one. Take that Social Media!!!